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Campaigns

Ten percent of the world population lives in Indian villages, where over 368 women in India are diagnosed with cervical cancer every day. In East Africa cervical cancer is the most common cause of cancer with almost two times more cases than breast cancer. Every 10 minutes, a woman in Africa dies from cervical cancer. In Nicaragua and El Salvador cervical cancer is the number one cause of death, number two in Peru. There are over 500,000 cases of cervical cancer found worldwide, and more than 280,000 women die of it every year. 85% live in developing countries. Read our East Africa, Latin America, and India campaigns to see how PINCC is fighting to prevent this!

East Africa

Every 10 minutes, a woman in Africa dies from cervical cancer. Each year, more than 60,000 women die. Compared to the United States, Africa has nine times the incidence of cervical cancer - but, worse, each case is 24 times as likely to be deadly. In East Africa cervical cancer is the most common cause of cancer, with almost two times more cases than breast cancer. Less than 3% of women in East Africa have ever been screened. The HIV/ AIDS epidemic has made the problem even worse, as the cancers develop more rapidly, and are not as treatable.

Latin America

In Nicaragua, Honduras and El Salvador, cervical cancer is the number one cause of cancer related death, and number two in Peru. In El Salvador, women face a very high incidence of cervical cancer, more than double that of the overall world rate. With a population of slightly over 7 million people, and with 60% of the female population between the ages of 15-64 years, there is a significant need for accessible, affordable cervical cancer screening. PINCC is working with the Ministries of Health in both countries to spread the training to all areas.

 

India

PINCC has trained in 2 areas of southern India, and is developing a “train the trainer” program in Mysore. Ten percent of the world population lives in Indian villages, outside the cities. Little, if any, preventive health care is available in these villages. More than 360 women in India are diagnosed with cervical cancer every day. This accounts for over 25 percent of annual new cervical cancer cases and 27 percent of cervical cancer deaths worldwide. Unfortunately once diagnosed an Indian woman’s chances of survival is 44 percent, slightly lower than the world average survival rate of 48 percent.